To Install The Practice Test

To complete this chapter, you must be familiar with basic administration concepts used in 220-701 test cost or Microsoft Windows 2000.
The domain functional level (known as domain mode in Windows 2000) provides a way to enable domain-wide Active Directory features within your network environment. Four domain functional levels are available: Windows 2000 mixed (default), Windows 2000 native, Windows Server 2003 interim, and Windows Server 2003. The Windows 2000 mixed functional level allows a Windows Server 2003 domain controller to interact with domain controllers in the same domain running Windows NT 4, Windows 2000, or the Windows Server 2003 family. The Windows 2000 native functional level allows a Windows Server 2003 domain controller to interact with domain controllers in the domain running Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003. The Windows Server 2003 interim functional level allows a Windows Server 2003 domain controller to interact with domain controllers in the domain running Windows NT 4 or Windows Server 2003. The Windows Server 2003 functional level allows a A plus certification online domain controller to interact only with domain controllers in the domain running Windows Server 2003. You can raise the functional level of a domain only if the domain controllers in the domain are running the appropriate version of Windows. See Chapter 3, “Administering Active Directory,” for details about raising domain functional levels.
As an administrator, you must create a domain structure to reflect your company’s organization. See Lesson 3, “Planning the Active Directory Infrastructure Design,” to learn the basics of domain design. See Chapter 4, “Installing and Managing Domains, Trees, and Forests,” for details about creating domains.
OUs An OH is a container used to organize objects within a domain into a logical administrative group. OUs provide a means for handling administrative tasks, such as the administration of users and resources, as they are the smallest scope to which you can delegate administrative authority. An OU can contain objects such as user accounts, groups, computers, printers, applications, file shares, and other OUs from the same domain. The OU hierarchy within a domain is independent of the OU hierarchy structure of other domainseach domain can implement its own OU hierarchy. By adding OUs to other OUs, or nesting, you can provide administrative control in a hierarchical fashion.
As an administrator, you must create an OU structure to reflect your company’s orga?nization. See Lesson 3, “Planning the Active Directory Infrastructure Design,” to learn the basics of OU design. See Free MCSE PDF questions, “Implementing an OU Structure,” to learn about implementing an OU structure.

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